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All posts for the month August, 2016

So, as readers may not know, we do this thing called Drunk Radio Shower where we pick a country and listen to music from that country and drunkenly comment on the music (for better or worse). But we’re only able to do that every couple of months and we enjoy the excuse to discover new music (to us) from varied places around the globe. So here is a new thing where we do a post, maybe once or twice a month, where we pick randomly pick a country, and our contributors go out and research and pick a favorite track/band to share. The dice have been rolled, and for issue #1 it’s Uruguay.

July 26, 2016 @ 01:16 PM

Jim here with my pick for Uruguay. After much deliberation and listening I settled on the eclectic mix that is Power Chocolatin Experimento. First of all, solid name. And interesting mix of sounds. Some metal-esque guitars. Sometimes punk and sometimes indie pop. Some Pink Floyd-esque stuff. Some jazz fusion. And all well done. A really great mix of sounds.

And I had a couple of other close choices. I really liked the indie minimalism of hombre común.

And I liked this from Oneill too. Though technically tagged as pop punk I really liked it. I don’t think it’s really pop punk at all. More indie.

August 14, 2016 @ 05:24 PM

Matt here checking in with my pick, as Delouners rides two chords and some Black Lips attitude in “Family”, the title track to an album they put out just about this time last year.

And since that only took up two minutes of your time, here’s some bonus tunes: Los Shakers and Los Mockers seem to have formed some type of Uruguayan Beatles vs. Stones rivalry soon after the British Invasion swept across the pond, though I’d argue that the latter band had more of an Animals vibe about them. Judge for yourself below.

August 14, 2016 @ 07:13 PM

and now, it’s time for david to make his Uruguay choice!  my listening, during an unusually busy august, has been more spread out in multiple casual backgroundish hearings, rather than any concerted effort to find *the* one band or song.  it turned out, though, that i kept coming back to one of the first bands i’d found:  Laura y los Branigan.

the minor key melodies, soft but driving female vocals, and ever-building rhythmic intensity (and, really, probably the reverb and echo-y delay) bring me back to my college days, listening to 1999-ish radiohead or portishead, or any other -head, really.  it’s the music that got me to branch out into other styles, to look for something new that i might like but not yet know; and what better kickoff of a series meant to force us to do just that?

August 14, 2016 @ 09:30 PM

My pick is Carmen Sandiego. They are essentially español Belle and Sebastian. Good for a pensive hungover radio shower (i.e. late summer). Here is their video for Agustín from 2010’s Joven Edad :

The album’s lyrics are pretty solid, with themes including  promiscuous Christians, Tamagotchi, and that garden variety subsect of gremlin boyfriends with a penchant for belching the alphabet. Worth translating.

While their latest Ciudad Dormitorio came out in 2013, they still seem pretty active, so if you’re around Montevideo on September 3 go check them out !

August 14, 2016 @ 09:45 PM

OK Sam again with a song for when you and your dildo are just tryna go to the discotheque…

 

In hindsight, the last few years of the 80’s were a strange time in Sonic Youth’s evolution. The band had long enjoyed critical success and just sold over 60,000 copies of Sister. They had also just contentiously left SST over the label’s now notorious accounting practices. Not long into the 90’s, they would release Goo on Geffen Records, but 1988’s classic Daydream Nation came out on Enigma, a sort of mini-major that enjoyed distribution through Capitol. So while the band didn’t have the cache to start their run of Letterman performances quite yet, they still found a way to sneak into NBC’s late-night programming via Night Music, a show that managed to broadcast performances by visionaries such as Lou Reed and John Cale, The Pixies, Sun Ra, and countless others out to a national audience over the course of its two year run.

It’s no surprise that the band chose to play “Silver Rocket” on the program. Nation‘s lead single “Teenage Riot” is damn near seven minutes long, and “Rocket” is about as close to a pop moment as you’ll find on the album. That doesn’t stop SY from absolutely tearing through the song live, though, including over a minute of earsplitting feedback smack dab in the middle (check the bend of the neck on Moore’s guitar around the 1:50 mark. It’s about as good an advertisement for Fender’s durability as the company could ask for). Again, this was all happening on national television.

The weirdness wasn’t quite over yet, as Gordon, Moore, Ranaldo, and Shelley would return later on to close out the show with an eviscerating take on “I Wanna Be Your Dog” with a little bit of help from the Indigo Girls (who appeared earlier on the same episode), host David Sanborn, and the house band. There are multiple WTF moments here, though my favorite might be “manager” Don Fleming battling Sanborn for mic time before giving up and spiking his flute to the ground like he had just scored in the Super Bowl. A keytar makes multiple appearances. Steve Shelley spends the entire three minutes grinning ear to ear, and it’s hard not to understand why.

Heaters earned some well deserved buzz with their surfy, psych garage “Mean Green” single, but last year’s Holy Water Pool seemed to double down on the reverb at the expense of atmosphere. Everything was so smooth, it was hard to grab onto individual parts as they floated by. The songs were still there (see examples A and B) but they needed to simmer awhile before they stood out individually. In a way, it reminded me of the Black Lips following up their breakthrough album with 200 Million Thousand: The band was still on drugs, just maybe the wrong kind.

So anyways, Holy Water Pool sounds to me like a very good effort held back by some interesting production choices, and it seems to have passed by many critics’ radars as a result. Have no fear, though, because within thirty seconds of “Centennial”, the lead track on HWP-successor Baptistina, it becomes very clear that Heaters have returned to their wheelhouse. This thing rips the whole way through, but nowhere is that more apparent than about three minutes into album terminus “Seafoam”. The rhythm section gets locked into something so tight it seems they might suffocate, and the guitars ride that groove through multiple ebbs and flows until everything eventually fades out. These might be the shortest six minutes of your day.

Go ahead and read up/spend up over at Beyond Beyond is Beyond.